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Serverless framework: a small example

Use case

I’ve been willing to give the serverless framework a try for a while, and recently I came up with a small side project that was a potential good fit for it.

I am a Monzo user, and I use their card to pay for things like my weekday lunches around the office or my travel expenses like Oyster Card top ups. I also happen to be a user of Toshl, which helps me with my personal finances and budgets.

Typically, whenever my Oyster card gets topped up or I pay for a lunch in a restaurant, I then input that expense into Toshl. But turns out both Monzo and Toshl are developer friendly, so I thought I could easily automate that process by having a system that would get certain Monzo expenses directly into Toshl for me, saving me a few seconds per day.

A serverless approach was ideal for this, especially since AWS offers a free tier for its services, meaning this would also not cost me a penny.

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Walk-through flang – Part 7

In previous chapters we saw how the input source was lexed, parsed and semantically analysed and we looked at how the symbols and data types are represented. But we haven’t looked at what happens once the semantic analysis finishes. In this installment we’re going to talk about the AST.

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Setting and deleting cookies in Go

In this post we’ll learn how to set and delete cookies as part of your Go HTTP Handlers. We’ll also learn one way to test our handlers using HTTP recorders.

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Redirect parts of your website to different applications with Apache

Microservices everywhere. Those are the times we live in now. Everyone seems to be splitting monolithic web applications into smaller chunks. And that’s fine. However, setting up the local development environment for this can be sometimes a bit cumbersome.

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Walk-through flang – Part 6

At this point we should have a reasonable picture of how flang parses and generates semantic information. So now it is time to explore with more detail what is actually synthesized and how it can be used later in the compiler. In this chapter we are going to see the symbol table.

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A very simple memory pool in C++11

I’ve been implementing an algorithm that works on a graph. That algorithm needs to create and destroy lots of nodes and edges to keep track of the algorithm state correctly. The algorithm also needs to be fast in order to be competitive against a similar algorithm that uses sets of stacks instead of graphs. Profiles show that memory allocations are impacting negatively the performance, so maybe a memory pool can help.

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Exploring AArch64 assembler – Chapter 9

In chapter 6 we saw conditional branches and we ended commenting that they can be used to implement higher control constructs. In this chapter we will see a few of them.
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Walk-through flang – Part 5

In the previous installment of this series we saw how flang parses the statements using an LR(1) algorithm. As the parser recognized the parts of the statements it invokes semantic actions. Today we’re going to talk more about them.

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Walk-through flang – Part 4

In the last installment we saw how flang splits the input in tokens. Once we have the tokens identified we need to parse them.
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Walk-through flang – Part 3

In the last chapter we saw how the driver handles the compilation and how it invokes flang1 and flang2. In this chapter we are going to start with flang1.
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