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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 4

As we advance learning the foundations of ARM assembler, our examples will become longer. Since it is easy to make mistakes, I think it is worth learning how to use GNU Debugger gdb to debug assembler. If you develop C/C++ in Linux and never used gdb, shame on you. If you know gdb this small chapter will explain you how to debug assembler directly.

gdb

We will use the example store01 from chapter 3. Start gdb specifying the program you are going to debug.

$ gdb --args ./store01
GNU gdb (GDB) 7.4.1-debian
Copyright (C) 2012 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later 
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "arm-linux-gnueabihf".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
...
Reading symbols from /home/roger/asm/chapter03/store01...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
(gdb)

Ok, we are in the interactive mode of gdb. In this mode you communicate with gdb using commands. There is a builtin help command called help. Or you can check the GNU Debugger Documentation. A first command to learn is

(gdb) quit

Ok, now start gdb again. The program is not running yet. In fact gdb will not be able to tell you many things about it since it does not have debugging info. But this is fine, we are debugging assembler, so we do not need much debugging info. So as a first step let’s start the program.

(gdb) start
Temporary breakpoint 1 at 0x8390
Starting program: /home/roger/asm/chapter03/store01 
 
Temporary breakpoint 1, 0x00008390 in main ()

Ok, gdb ran our program up to main. This is great, we have skipped all the initialization steps of the C library and we are about to run the first instruction of our main function. Let’s see whats there.

(gdb) disassemble
Dump of assembler code for function main:
=> 0x00008390 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #40]	; 0x83c0 
   0x00008394 :	mov	r3, #3
   0x00008398 :	str	r3, [r1]
   0x0000839c :	ldr	r2, [pc, #32]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083a0 :	mov	r3, #4
   0x000083a4 :	str	r3, [r2]
   0x000083a8 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #16]	; 0x83c0 
   0x000083ac :	ldr	r1, [r1]
   0x000083b0 :	ldr	r2, [pc, #12]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083b4 :	ldr	r2, [r2]
   0x000083b8 :	add	r0, r1, r2
   0x000083bc :	bx	lr
End of assembler dump.

Uh-oh! The instructions referring the label addr_of_myvarX are different. Ok. Ignore that for now, we will learn in a future chapter what has happened. There is an arrow => pointing the instruction we are going to run (it has not been run yet). Before running it, let’s inspect some registers.

(gdb) info registers r0 r1 r2 r3
r0             0x1	1
r1             0xbefff744	3204446020
r2             0xbefff74c	3204446028
r3             0x8390	33680

We can modify registers using p which means print but also evaluates side effects. For instance,

(gdb) p $r0 = 2
$1 = 2
(gdb) info registers r0 r1 r2 r3
r0             0x2	2
r1             0xbefff744	3204446020
r2             0xbefff74c	3204446028
r3             0x8390	33680

gdb has printed $1, this is the identifier of the result and we can use it when needed, so we can skip some typing. Not very useful now but it will be when we print a complicated expression.

(gdb) p $1
$2 = 2

Now we could use $2, and so on. Ok, time to run the first instruction.

(gdb) stepi
0x00008394 in main ()

Well, not much happened, let’s use disassemble, again.

(gdb) disassemble
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00008390 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #40]	; 0x83c0 
=> 0x00008394 :	mov	r3, #3
   0x00008398 :	str	r3, [r1]
   0x0000839c :	ldr	r2, [pc, #32]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083a0 :	mov	r3, #4
   0x000083a4 :	str	r3, [r2]
   0x000083a8 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #16]	; 0x83c0 
   0x000083ac :	ldr	r1, [r1]
   0x000083b0 :	ldr	r2, [pc, #12]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083b4 :	ldr	r2, [r2]
   0x000083b8 :	add	r0, r1, r2
   0x000083bc :	bx	lr
End of assembler dump.

Ok, let’s see what happened in r1.

(gdb) info register r1
r1             0x10564	66916

Great, it has changed. In fact this is the address of myvar1. Let’s check this using its symbolic name and C syntax.

(gdb) p &myvar1
$3 = ( *) 0x10564

Great! Can we see what is in this variable?

(gdb) p myvar1
$4 = 0

Perfect. This was as expected since in this example we set zero as the initial value of myvar1 and myvar2. Ok, next step.

(gdb) stepi
0x00008398 in main ()
(gdb) disas
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00008390 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #40]	; 0x83c0 
   0x00008394 :	mov	r3, #3
=> 0x00008398 :	str	r3, [r1]
   0x0000839c :	ldr	r2, [pc, #32]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083a0 :	mov	r3, #4
   0x000083a4 :	str	r3, [r2]
   0x000083a8 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #16]	; 0x83c0 
   0x000083ac :	ldr	r1, [r1]
   0x000083b0 :	ldr	r2, [pc, #12]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083b4 :	ldr	r2, [r2]
   0x000083b8 :	add	r0, r1, r2
   0x000083bc :	bx	lr
End of assembler dump.

You can use disas (but not disa!) as a short for disassemble. Let’s check what happened to r3

(gdb) info registers r3
r3             0x3	3

So far so good. Another more step.

(gdb) stepi
0x0000839c in main ()
(gdb) disas
Dump of assembler code for function main:
   0x00008390 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #40]	; 0x83c0 
   0x00008394 :	mov	r3, #3
   0x00008398 :	str	r3, [r1]
=> 0x0000839c :	ldr	r2, [pc, #32]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083a0 :	mov	r3, #4
   0x000083a4 :	str	r3, [r2]
   0x000083a8 :	ldr	r1, [pc, #16]	; 0x83c0 
   0x000083ac :	ldr	r1, [r1]
   0x000083b0 :	ldr	r2, [pc, #12]	; 0x83c4 
   0x000083b4 :	ldr	r2, [r2]
   0x000083b8 :	add	r0, r1, r2
   0x000083bc :	bx	lr
End of assembler dump.

Ok, lets see what happened, we stored r3, which contained a 3 into myvar1, right? Let’s check this.

(gdb) p myvar1
$5 = 3

Amazing, isn’t it? Ok. Now run until the end.

(gdb) continue
Continuing.
[Inferior 1 (process 3080) exited with code 07]

That’s all for today.

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