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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 25

In chapter 13 we saw VFPv2 and the fact that it allows vectorial operations on floating-point numbers. You may be wondering if such a similar feature exists for integers. The answer is yes although in a more limited way.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 24

Today we will continue with nested functions.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 22

Several times in previous chapters we have talked about ARM as an architecture that has several features aimed at embedding systems. In embedded systems memory is scarce and expensive, so designs that help reduce the memory footprint are very welcome. Today we will see another of these features: the Thumb instruction set.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 12

We saw in chapter 6 some simple schemes to implement usual structured programming constructs like if-then-else and loops. In this chapter we will revisit these constructs and exploit a feature of the ARM instruction set that we have not learnt yet.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 11

Several times, in earlier chapters, I stated that the ARM architecture was designed with the embedded world in mind. Although the cost of the memory is everyday lower, it still may account as an important part of the budget of an embedded system. The ARM instruction set has several features meant to reduce the impact […]

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 10

In chapter 9 we were introduced to functions and we saw that they have to follow a number of conventions in order to play nice with other functions. We also briefly mentioned the stack, as an area of memory owned solely by the function. In this chapter we will go in depth with the stack […]

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 9

In previous chapters we learnt the foundations of ARM assembler: registers, some arithmetic operations, loads and stores and branches. Now it is time to put everything together and add another level of abstraction to our assembler skills: functions.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 8

In the previous chapter we saw that the second operand of most arithmetic instructions can use a shift operator which allows us to shift and rotate bits. In this chapter we will continue learning the available indexing modes of ARM instructions. This time we will focus on load and store instructions.

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 7

ARM architecture has been for long targeted at embedded systems. Embedded systems usually end being used in massively manufactured products (dishwashers, mobile phones, TV sets, etc). In this context margins are very tight so a designer will always try to spare as much components as possible (a cent saved in hundreds of thousands or even […]

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ARM assembler in Raspberry Pi – Chapter 6

Control structures In the previous chapter we learnt branch instructions. They are really powerful tools because they allow us to express control structures. Structured programming is an important milestone in better computing engineering (a foundational one, but nonetheless an important one). So being able to map usual structured programming constructs in assembler, in our processor, […]

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